Support Our Team’s Work

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Have you found something worthwhile or valuable to you on the site? Would you like to support the work of our dedicated team of mental health professionals? Here’s how you can contribute to the effort.

Have You Found Something that Matters to You?

Have you found something personally worthwhile on our site? Maybe you found the answer to something you’ve wondered about, or perhaps an article confirmed something you already believed — or even challenged you to think about something differently. We hope so! Would you like to help with the efforts that make it all possible?

Supporting the Effort Financially

Just keeping this site and our sister site AskThePsych.com running costs several thousand dollars each year. That’s before we even begin to produce content, including hundreds of original articles and psychologist replies every year. (At last count, Ask the Psychologist was closing in on 3000 replies, while CounsellingResource.com and our other smaller sites — such as the new Minds on Meds — add another 1500 articles spanning more than 5000 pages.)

If you’d like to personally make the site a better place, to help ensure we can keep the lights on, and to indirectly reach out to help the thousands of people who visit, we’d welcome your support.

Using PayPal, you can choose to contribute any amount at all:

If you’d rather not use PayPal, or you’d prefer to remain anonymous, you can also help by sending Bitcoins, using the following address or QR code:

1ABxSEg2QQeKsWxGbkq54d4Rj1ineRtHsS

btc

Other Ways You Can Help

You can also help the work of this site by getting the word out: if you’ve found something you think is worthwhile, we hope you’ll share it! Let your friends know, share it on Facebook, Tweet about it, mention it in an article of your own, include us in lists of resources you might be responsible for maintaining — it’s all helpful.

Whatever you decide to do, we appreciate it!

All clinical material on this site is peer reviewed by one or more clinical psychologists or other qualified mental health professionals. This specific article was originally published by on and was last reviewed or updated by Dr Greg Mulhauser, Managing Editor on .

Overseen by an international advisory board of distinguished academic faculty and mental health professionals with decades of clinical and research experience in the US, UK and Europe, CounsellingResource.com provides peer-reviewed mental health information you can trust. Our material is not intended as a substitute for direct consultation with a qualified mental health professional. CounsellingResource.com is accredited by the Health on the Net Foundation.

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